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ALL THAT GLITTERS IS NOT GOLD: A CASE STUDY OF A HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES COLLEGE READINESS PROGRAM

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dc.contributor.author Hanks, Shantè T.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-12-15T22:47:11Z
dc.date.available 2021-12-15T22:47:11Z
dc.date.issued 2021-08
dc.identifier.citation Hanks, S. T. (2021). All that glitters is not gold: A case study of a historically black colleges and universities college readiness program (Order No. 28719677). Available from Dissertations & Theses @ University of Bridgeport; ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (2572564926). en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://scholarworks.bridgeport.edu/xmlui/handle/123456789/4479
dc.description Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education the School of Education, University of Bridgeport. en_US
dc.description.abstract Researchers are finding the traditional vision of college readiness is not working for today’s disconnected youth. Hess (2010) and Hehir (2012) affirm that the one-size fits all approach for advising students about postsecondary education does not work for all students. This retrospective case study sought the perspectives of participants in a college readiness program located in the ‘gold coast’ of Connecticut. For over thirty years, the program’s goal has been to introduce Black, first-generation students from New England to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Black students are generally as likely as their peers from other racial and ethnic groups to aspire to earn a college degree, yet in spite of their aspirations, remain under-represented in college enrollment and graduation (Holland, 2007). This study is relevant because a workforce shortage of three million college graduates is expected (Carnevale et al., 2010). Blumenstyk (2020) predicts by 2027, 70% of all jobs will require some education beyond high school and fewer jobs will be available for people with some or no college degree. This prediction indicates a need for high school graduates to continue their education into college where they can learn the necessary skills to obtain a quality job in the future. However, certain underrepresented groups are accessing and persisting in college at lower rates than expected by many educators and policymakers. Literature indicates that the first year of college can be more challenging for first-generation college students than their peers who have college-educated parents. The study also revealed that Black, first-generation students have a different experience than White students when on a college campus even when engaging with the same faculty and the same campus activities (Museus et al., 2017). College campus communities that provide an environment of belonging and focuses on a culturally conscious framework, cultivates a connection for students to their campus community (Hurtado & Carter, 1997) and as a result have better retention rates that leads to more students graduating with bachelor degrees. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject College readiness programs en_US
dc.subject Critical race theory en_US
dc.subject Culturally engaging college campus en_US
dc.subject First-generation college students en_US
dc.subject Historically black colleges and universities en_US
dc.subject Retrospective case study en_US
dc.title ALL THAT GLITTERS IS NOT GOLD: A CASE STUDY OF A HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES COLLEGE READINESS PROGRAM en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.institute.department School of Education en_US
dc.institute.name University of Bridgeport en_US


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