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Enhancing Nurse Residency Programs with High Quality Simulation and Debriefing

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dc.contributor.author Booth, Christine
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-26T14:39:14Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-26T14:39:14Z
dc.date.issued 2018-03-23
dc.identifier.uri https://scholarworks.bridgeport.edu/xmlui/handle/123456789/2100
dc.description.abstract Inadequate clinical judgment in newly graduated nurses has been positively linked to decreased patient outcomes and lower nursing job satisfaction, compelling staff nurse educators to employ innovative evidence-based methods to remedy this known clinical-practice gap. Use of quality simulation and theory-based debriefing has been shown in the evidence to positively contribute to clinical judgment formation in novice nurses. Incorporating quality simulation and theory-based debriefing into nurse residency programs has the potential to increase job satisfaction and decrease turnover, resulting in better outcomes and quality for patients and less cost for health care organizations. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental evidence-based change project with pretest/post-test design, aimed at increasing clinical judgment and learner satisfaction in novice nurses through evidence-based teaching measures. Debriefing for Meaningful learning, a theory-based debriefing pedagogy, and quality simulation scenarios were added to an existing nurse residency program. A pre and post learner satisfaction survey, the Debriefing Experience Scale was given to measure satisfaction with program changes. The scale is a two-part 5 point Likert scale which measures the participant experience as well as areas of perceived importance. Current evidence supported the validity and reliability of the scale with student nurses, although further testing had been encouraged with other participant types. Results: A paired samples T-test correlation was conducted in comparing the pre- and post-intervention experience and importance subsets completed by the program participants. The agreement portion of the scale measured a mean of 4.54 in June, 4.47 in July and 4.42 in August. The importance portion of the scale measured a mean of 4.39 in June, 4.25 in July and 4.23 in August revealing no statistical significance with program changes. Test-retest reliability was conducted to further validate the validity and reliability of the Debriefing Experience Scale with a post-graduate, post-licensure population. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient remained consistently greater than .894 within each month of the program. These findings further validate that the DES is a valid and reliable tool to determine participant satisfaction following a simulation and debriefing experience. Conclusions: Simulation and Debriefing for Meaningful Learning are evidence-based teaching methodologies which have been shown in the literature to positively affect clinical judgment development in participants. The data which was collected looked at the satisfaction of participants involved in a simulation and theory-based debriefing pedagogy, as compared to simulation and informal debriefing measures. Although no statistically significant increase in participant satisfaction could be empirically determined, it can be surmised that learner experience was enhanced through implemented changes. Participants reported high satisfaction with the program both pre and post implementation. As participants remained satisfied despite program changes, use of simulation and DML within residency programs can be supported. In addition, the validity and reliability of the Debriefing Experience Scale were established with a postgraduate population. These findings further validate that the DES is a valid and reliable tool to determine participant satisfaction following a simulation and debriefing experience. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject Nursing residency en_US
dc.subject Simulation en_US
dc.title Enhancing Nurse Residency Programs with High Quality Simulation and Debriefing en_US
dc.type Other en_US
dc.institute.department School of Nursing en_US
dc.institute.name University of Bridgeport en_US
dc.event.location Bridgeport, CT en_US
dc.event.name Faculty Research Day en_US


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